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Garmin fenix 6S Pro, Ultimate Multisport GPS Watch, Smaller-Sized, Features Mapping, Music, Grade-Adjusted Pace Monitoring and Pulse Ox Sensors, Black with Black Band

£9.9£99Clearance
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Data include pace, and distance time information. – but also lap data, cadence, heart rate, zones, and more. It’s a top-running experience, but no different from top-end Forerunners as we’ve already mentioned. What’s really cool though is going into Power Manager and creating your own configurations. This allows you to tweak the battery burn profile based on which features you want enabled or disabled. And it’ll actually tell you exactly how many hours it’ll save (or cost you) to make that setting change: The Garmin Fenix 6 comes in multiple flavors and price points, so we'll just break them down here first. Watch-based respiration rate is a new metric for Garmin, and it show promise. I did not physically count my physical breaths per minute but I did find that my estimated respiration rate both awake and asleep accurately reflected my general fitness level. As Garmin accrues respiration data and begins analyzing this data, it’ll be interesting see how this metric evolves in future watches. Battery life This isn’t a Garmin problem, it’s the same for any optical sensor on the market and it’s not going to change anytime soon.

For heat acclimation it applies a heat correction factor for rides above 71°F/22°C, using a percentage based amount from published studies (humidity is also factored into this as well). This is then shown in the training status widget. Garmin says they assume full acclimation takes a minimum of 4 days, and acclimation/adaptation to a given high temperature will automatically decay after 3 days of skipped training within that heat level. This feature estimates your blood’s oxygen saturation. By default, it’s turned off to save battery life, but you can change that if you prefer it to run constantly. I run a few times a week outdoors. I loved my old Forerunner 10 for runs, but the Fenix 6s Pro far outstrips it. The GPS locator is fast, even when you’re in an unfamiliar area. It also had no trouble finding me whether I was at home or someplace new.

The Fenix 6 Pro watches all have the same five-button design you’ll find on most Garmins, and the overall look hasn’t changed much from the Fenix 5 Plus series. The watches are chunky, and have exposed screws on the bezel. However, Garmin has increased the screen size on all of the watches besides the 6S versions, which still have the same 240 x 240 1.2in panel as the Fenix 5S. The 6 and 6 Pro watches have a 260 x 260 1.3in screen and the 6X Pro and 6X Pro Solar both have the same impressive 280 x 280 1.4in display. A new metric introduced over the last year is Garmin’s Body Battery. Think of this like the old Street Fighter arcade game, whereby if you got a good night’s sleep it’d start at 100%, and then throughout the day would degrade. It’d go down faster for more intense things, and re-gain battery status if you’re sitting on a couch watching TV. I find it a good proxy, though occasionally not perfect. Within the watch you can see the last four hours, as well as four hours overlaid against stress. Further, you can see how much has charged or drained since midnight. As you can see, I’ve blown out my ‘Aerobic High’ target. If I’m short in a given area, then it’ll tell me what to do. Or, in my case, since I’m somehow not short in any areas, it’ll tell me what my training has been doing lately in terms of benefit:

Whereas the second one, focused more on the high altitude aspect of things over the course of 7 days, then you can plot PulseOx readings against altitude. You’ll see this in both the widget and online: The feature does get more useful if you add GPX data to follow waypoints on a run or hike, and the extra data from the TOPO helps put your run in context with placements of rivers, woods, and the like. It's not good enough to go navigating your way around the wilderness without a proper map, however. Fenix 6S heart rate accuracy With its glass face, I was worried the Fenix would be more like a delicate new iPhone than my old plastic-and-silicone Forerunner. But after 2 months of drops, scrapes, and bangs, I’m happy to report it remains scratch-free. While I could see this feature being useful if you were trying to work on more even splits, I actually found it kind of annoying when I tested it out. I usually base my runs off of a distance goal rather than time goal, and I don’t pay a ton of attention to my speed, so it was kind of obnoxious to have the watch alert me every time I was going faster or slower than it wanted me to. All watches in the Fenix 6 and Fenix 7 lines have color memory-in-pixel (MIP) displays. These aren't as bright as the AMOLED screens used by devices like the Garmin Venu 2 and Garmin Epix, but they use significantly less power. This results in longer battery life, which is a big advantage for watches built with extensive GPS use in mind.Watches in the Garmin Fenix 6 range have received hefty price cuts in recent months (Image credit: Garmin) Design, display and battery life Design

I have always paced my races using kilometre splits, so PacePro instantly appealed and I loved using it in my race. At the start of each kilometre, I could see how fast I was expected to go, and see at a glance how hilly it was going to be. Though I actually ran faster than my target time for the race, it was still a hugely useful tool for judging how to approach each split. Once you enable the low power battery mode virtually everything is disabled: Optical heart rate, Bluetooth phone connectivity, external ANT+ sensors, and even the display itself goes into a low-power mode where it uses a custom watch face that doesn’t show seconds. When you ask yourself whether something is disabled in this mode – the answer is ‘yes’. Though, it only takes a single button press and you’re ready to start a run with GPS as normal (or, with your own custom battery mode):Adds solar charging to Fenix 6 Pro Solar: Termed “Power Glass”, this will increase battery life on sunnier days And the analytics is insane. Running offers top-notch dynamics and VO2 Max analysis, including Training Effect, Training Status, HRV, stress, Body Battery, recovery, and even recommendations on the types of workouts missing in your weekly plan. That data gets fed into the revamped Training Status functionality/widget, which shows the direction your fitness level and load levels are trending.

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